Category Archives: Cavitary Coccidioidomycosis

Predictive Factors of Long-term Compliance With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Conclusion

The good compliance results obtained in our study are partly linked to the way that patients are supervised. Sanders et al found it important to provide good initial training in the use of the apparatus, contrary to the results of Schweitzer et al and of Fletcher and Luckett, who found similar compliance in two groups of patients where one group was well-trained while the other … Continue reading

Predictive Factors of Long-term Compliance With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Discussion

In order to study the compliance of patients with CPAP, we defined compliance as a function of subjective and objective criteria. To be defined as compliant, patients had to use the apparatus throughout the night every night, for an average duration equal to or greater than 5 h per night (time counter). By applying these criteria, compliance was 68 percent (30 of 44). The choice … Continue reading

Predictive Factors of Long-term Compliance With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Results

Forty-four patients were studied for a mean of 14 months (range, 8 to 39 months) after beginning the treatment. Data on the use of CPAP are detailed in Table 1. At the end of the study, 41 patients still used their apparatus every night, and the apparatus was used all night by 36 patients. At this time the quantitative study of the mean length of … Continue reading

Predictive Factors of Long-term Compliance With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Statistical Analysis

The 44 patients (39 men and 5 women) were, on average, 58 years old (range, 40 to 82 years) and had a mean body mass index (BMI) of 34.9 ± 8.02 kg/m2. Heart disease was diagnosed in 39 percent (17) of the patients, and 70 percent (31) of the patients were receiving antihypertensive treatment. The initial examination consisted of an exploration of respiratory function and … Continue reading

Cavitary Coccidioidomycosis With Fungus Ball Formation: Discussion

The indications for surgical removal of a cavity are variable and include the following: (1) rapidly expanding cavity (> 4 cm) close to visceral pleura with risk of imminent rupture; (2) serious or persistent hemoptysis; (3) symptomatic fungus ball; (4) bronchopleural fistula; (5) persistence greater than 1 year; and/or (6) culture-positive sputum. Underlying host compromise, including diabetes, has been proposed as mandating surgical removal. Surgical … Continue reading

Cavitary Coccidioidomycosis With Fungus Ball Formation: Case 2

A 56-year-old man with a 22-packs/year smoking history presented with a 2-month history of intermittent, weekly hemoptysis of approximately one teaspoonful per episode. He had a history of cardiac disease (two heart attacks), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. There were no complaints of fever, chills, night sweats, fatigue, gastrointestinal discomfort, or dyspnea; he had never previously experienced hemoptysis. The previous month he experienced a weight … Continue reading

Cavitary Coccidioidomycosis With Fungus Ball Formation: Case 1

A 20-year-old woman was transferred to Fitzsimons Army Medical Center for evaluation of hematemesis, possible hemoptysis, and a cavity of the right lung. Over a period of 7 years, she had experienced nausea and abdominal pain with intermittent hematemesis; chest pain and hemoptysis were also described. These symptoms, although intermittent, occurred as frequendy as every 1 to 2 weeks. Previously, an upper gastrointestinal barium examination … Continue reading

Cavitary Coccidioidomycosis With Fungus Ball Formation

Infection with the dimorphic fungus, Coccidioides immitis, is common in the southwestern United States and other areas of the lower Sonoran life zone. Inhalation of arthrospores results in pulmonary infection that is usually symptomless and recognized only by skin test conversion. A pneumonia, clinically apparent or not, may resolve completely or persist, and sequelae of the infection may be seen roentgenologically as a nodule or … Continue reading