Category Archives: Sperm

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: MATERIALS AND METHODS(3)

Establishment of Isthmic, Ampullar, and Porcine Kidney Epithelial Cell Culture in Chamber Slides Frozen cryogenic vials of isthmic, ampullar, and LLC-PK1 (European Collection of Animal Cell Cultures, Wiltshire, UK) cells were thawed in a water bath at 37°C. Medium A (9 ml) was added to each cell type and mixed gently. The epithelial cells were centrifuged at 100 X g for 2 min. The supernatant … Continue reading

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: MATERIALS AND METHODS(2)

The media containing scraped tissues from ampulla and isthmus were collected separately and, after initial sedimentation, were gently centrifuged for 3 min at 100 X g. The supernatants were discarded, and 5 ml of medium A, containing tissue culture medium (TCM) 199 (Life Technologies) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS; Life Technologies), 100 U/ml penicillin, 100 ^g/ml streptomycin, and 0.25 ^g/ml amphotericin B, was … Continue reading

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: MATERIALS AND METHODS(1)

OEC Preparation Oviducts were obtained at a local slaughterhouse from prepubertal gilts of ~120 days of age. The ovaries did not show any signs of cyclicity such as follicular growth, ovulation, or the presence of corpora lutea, and they were covered with small follicles (2-3-mm diameter). Oviducts were transported to the laboratory in PBS at room temperature (22°C). Upon arrival, the oviducts were cleaned and … Continue reading

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: Induction of Capacitation and Preferential Binding of Uncapacitated Spermatozoa to Oviductal Epithelial Cells in Porcine Species(3)

In the present investigation, we hypothesized that 1) the OEC should not bind capacitated sperm—otherwisesperm transport within the oviduct would be blocked; and 2) once sperm are bound to OEC, they are likely to become capacitated before release. Therefore, 3) it follows that the sperm-OEC interaction must be specific, causing alterations of sperm functional status not achieved by other cell types in vitro. To test … Continue reading

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: Induction of Capacitation and Preferential Binding of Uncapacitated Spermatozoa to Oviductal Epithelial Cells in Porcine Species(2)

Within the transilluminated oviducts of naturally mated mice, some hyperactivated sperm were seen swimming freely while all nonhyperactivated sperm appeared tightly bound to the epithelium. Moreover, Demott et al. showed that fetuin interfered with hamster sperm attachment to the oviductal epithelium by binding to the acrosomal region of fresh epididymal sperm. However, fetuin did not bind to hyperactivated sperm. These results imply that there is … Continue reading

Sperm-Oviduct Interaction: Induction of Capacitation and Preferential Binding of Uncapacitated Spermatozoa to Oviductal Epithelial Cells in Porcine Species(1)

After mating, inseminated mammalian spermatozoa are transported to the oviduct. They attach to and interact with oviductal epithelial cells (OEC), and as a result of this interaction, a reservoir of spermatozoa forms in the oviduct. In several species, the reservoir has been shown to be limited to the caudal isthmus, and spermatozoa are held there until ovulation when a small number are released to meet … Continue reading

The Oviductal Sperm Reservoir in Mammals: Mechanisms of Formation(6)

Thus, carbohydrate involvement in sperm binding to epithelium appears to be a widespread phenomenon, although the particular carbohydrate moiety that constitutes the binding site varies according to species. In each of the three species studied so far, a different sugar maximally inhibited binding. These species differences may not seem so unusual when one considers that a single amino acid residue can determine the ligand specificity … Continue reading

The Oviductal Sperm Reservoir in Mammals: Mechanisms of Formation(5)

Soluble oviductal factors do enhance capacitation of bull sperm. So, sperm release is brought about by changes within the sperm, although these changes could be initiated by signals from the oviduct. buy flovent inhaler Sperm binding to oviductal epithelium appears to involve carbohydrate recognition. The first evidence for this came from our studies with fetuin and its terminal sugar sialic acid, which were found to inhibit binding of … Continue reading

The Oviductal Sperm Reservoir in Mammals: Mechanisms of Formation(4)

Capacitation involves changes in the plasma membrane over the sperm head and therefore may lead to sperm release by eliminating or modifying binding molecules on the head. Hyperactivation may provide the force necessary for overcoming the attraction between sperm and oviductal epithelium. Smith and Yanagimachi reported that hamster sperm that had undergone both capacitation and hyperactivation in vitro did not bind to epithelium when infused … Continue reading

The Oviductal Sperm Reservoir in Mammals: Mechanisms of Formation(3)

There are large and small folds in the mucosa, some of which create grooves that end blindly. There is also a multilayered vascular plexus in the wall that resembles erectile tissue and could serve to reduce the lumen. The wall of the junction and lower isthmus contains a thick muscular layer that could further compress the lumen, the action being accentuated by muscle in the … Continue reading