Trends in Lung Surgery: In-Hospital Mortality

Trends in Lung Surgery: In-Hospital MortalityTable 4 presents the characteristics of patients who underwent lung resections who died during the entire study period (1988 to 2002) and by time period (1988 to 1992, 1993 to 1997, and 1998 to 2002). From 1988 to 2002, 4.8% of patients undergoing lung resections died during their hospitalization. In comparison to all patients who had undergone lung resections, the patients who died were an average of 5 years older, had an increased length of care, and were more likely to be male, white, and Medicare recipients. The ratio of mortality rate to procedures performed was highest in hospitals with 200 to 299 beds and lowest in those with 6 to 99 beds for the entire study period.
The mortality rate decreased from 5.0% in the first time period (1988 to 1992) to 4.1% in the second period (1993 to 1997), but increased again to 5.4% in the third time period (1998 to 2002). Age and length of care among patients who died did not vary significantly between time periods. An increase in the proportion of male patients who died in the hospital after surgery was found from the first to the second time period (74.1% to 83.8%, respectively). The proportion of male patients who died decreased in the third time period to 77.7%, but remained higher than the proportion in the first time period. www.alphagan-eye-drops.com
Changes in race distribution among patients who died were seen over time but are difficult to interpret because of the increasing number of patients for whom race is not reported. Changes in the primary source of payment over time were also found. The proportion of Medicare recipients increased from the first to the second time period (58.5% to 69.2%, respectively) and decreased during the third time period (63.0%), but remained higher than in the first period. The mortality rate of privately insured patients had the opposite trend. The percentage of deceased Medicaid recipients increased in each time period. The proportion of fatalities increased over time in hospitals with < 99 beds and steadily decreased in those with 100 to 199 beds. While the proportion of fatalities decreased from the first to the second time period and increased thereafter in hospitals with 200 to 299 beds, the opposite observation was made for larger hospitals.

This entry was posted in Lung injury and tagged epidemiology, lung, surgery.